Wednesday, August 03, 2005

Something was missing

AP bobbled the ball a little on this past weekend's coverage of the Baseball Hall of Fame induction. Looking at the story in my paper -- and checking Nexis -- nowhere in the story by John Kekis does it say what position Boggs played.

Now I know he was inducted primarily for his slugging, but baseball is more than hitting and it's kind of customary to list a player's position. That was even more so here, I think, because the other inductee, Ryne Sandberg, was a sterling second baseman, and so his position was highlighted.

For the record, Boggs played third base, and it could have been inserted smoothly in about the fourth graf:

"I am living proof that dreams come true," said Boggs, the consistent-hitting third baseman who began playing minor league ball in the Red Sox system in Elmira, N.Y., in 1976. "In life, so many things are taken for granted, but one thing I can honestly say is that I took every day, enjoyed putting on that uniform and playing the great game of baseball."

That same story had this graf: Sandberg won MVP honors in 1984, hitting a career-high .314 with 19 homers, 84 RBIs, 114 runs, 32 stolen bases, and made only six errors in 156 games.

Touch it up for clarity:
Sandberg won MVP honors in 1984, hitting a career-high .314 with 19 homers, 84 RBIs, 114 runs and 32 stolen bases, and made only six errors in 156 games.

1 Comments:

At 8/3/05, 3:56 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I am constantly surprised by how many sports stories actually fail to mention the particular sport. I know this because in my 20s and 30s I moved around a lot and when I would move to a new city, I would be unfamiliar with some of the local teams (of course not the MAJOR teams). Even in Washington, D.C., papers often take for granted that the readers know what sport you are talking about simply by naming the teams. I was reading a wire story the other day about two Olympic athletes. I knew one of them was a swimmer, but I guess was supposed to assume the other was a swimmer as well because the story never identified what sport he represented.

 

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